Publication cover.

Current Info Sheet

Why add edible and floral plants to riparian forest buffers?

Publication cover.

Current Info Sheet

How can agroforestry help landowners adapt to climate change?

Cover of issue.

Current Issue

Finding Agroforestry in the 2014 Farm Bill

The latest issue of the Inside Agroforestry Newsletter features the Agricultural Act of 2014 (2014 Farm Bill). The 2014 Farm Bill provides numerous opportunities for landowners to get financial support for agroforestry through USDA programs.

National Agroforestry Center

The USDA National Agroforestry Center (NAC) accelerates the application of agroforestry through a national network of partners. Together, we conduct research, develop technologies and tools, coordinate demonstrations and training, and provide useful information to natural resource professionals. Read more about the National Agroforestry Center…

Around Agroforestry

Partnership Provides Windbreaks New Life

Posted January 7, 2016

Windbreak of hardwood trees along a field, a hay roll to the side, in Douglas County, Kansas.
Windbreak along field in Douglas County, Kansas.

Windbreaks are an important practice for many Kansas farmers and ranchers. Among many benefits they help protect the soil and enhance crop productivity. But many windbreaks in the state are old and tired, and need repair. The Kansas Forest Service (KFS) identified this concern as a priority in its State Forest Action Plan, and a few years ago organized windbreak assessments in the southwestern and western parts of the state to learn more about the condition of existing windbreaks.

Continue reading about the partnership providing windbreaks…

Silvopasture Works with Landscape, Climate to Meet Farming Goals

Posted December 2, 2015

Icelandic sheep grazing in an orchard.
Icelandic sheep mowing the orchard floor. Photo by Tobias Carter, Savanna Institute.

By Keefe Keeley, Savanna Institute

At Badgersett Research Farm near Canton, Minnesota, Icelandic sheep mow the orchard floor and add fertility for hickory and pecan trees, which in turn provide the sheep shade and shelter.

Although a subject of contemporary agricultural science, silvopasture has timeless roots. The word comes from the Latin “silva” for forest, or the Roman deity Silvanus, known for protecting woodlands, fields, and flocks of livestock. Aptly enough, silvopasture integrates these very elements of the farm.

Continue reading…

New Pollinator Publications

Posted November 13, 2015

National Agroforestry Center publication covers regarding pollinators.

The National Agroforestry Center has developed a number of publications that describe the role agroforestry can play in supporting pollinators. “How can agroforestry help pollinators?” is a two-page information sheet that highlights opportunities to recognize, protect, and enhance pollinator habitat. “Working Trees for Pollinators” is a six-page color brochure that illustrates important pollinators for food production and how agroforestry practices can be adapted to meet the needs of both pollinators and producers. The recent issue of our Inside Agroforestry newsletter is titled “Learn How You Can Use Agroforestry Help Pollinators”. Visit our Agroforestry Notes and Pollinators web pages for more information about pollinators and agroforestry.

Around Agroforestry Archive…

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About Agroforestry

Agroforestry intentionally combines agriculture and forestry to create integrated and sustainable land-use systems. Agroforestry takes advantage of the interactive benefits from combining trees and shrubs with crops and/or livestock. Agroforestry practices include:

About the NAC

The USDA National Agroforestry Center (NAC) had its origins in the 1990 Farm Bill. It began as a Forest Service Research and State & Private Forestry effort in 1992 and expanded into a partnership with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in 1995. It is administered by the Forest Service's, Washington, DC, Office of Research and Development. NAC offices are located in Lincoln, Nebraska and Blacksburg, Virginia.

NAC accelerates the application of agroforestry through a national network of partners. Together, we conduct research, develop technologies and tools, coordinate demonstrations and training, and provide useful information to natural resource professionals.

About Working Trees

The right trees planted in the right places for the right reasons can add value to land-use systems. That's the Working Trees message that helps natural resource professionals, community leaders, and landowners identify with the concept of agroforestry. NAC uses the Working Trees theme to promote the development of sustainable agriculture and communities.

 

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