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Current Issue

Why Agroforestry? Part II

As we searched for stories on the topic of "Why Agroforestry?" for Inside Agroforestry, we heard so many insightful experiences and perspectives that we decided to create two issues.

Publication cover.

Current Info Sheet

How does agroforestry help crop pollination?

National Agroforestry Center

The USDA National Agroforestry Center (NAC) accelerates the application of agroforestry through a national network of partners. Together, we conduct research, develop technologies and tools, coordinate demonstrations and training, and provide useful information to natural resource professionals. Read more about the National Agroforestry Center…

Around Agroforestry

Multifunctional Riparian Buffers: Synergies with Bioenergy Crops and Ecosystem Service Provision

Posted January 18, 2017

Dr. Michael Jacobson. Dr. Michael Jacobson.

In a NewBIO Webinar on January 17, 2017, Dr. Michael Jacobson, Penn State University Professor of Forest Resources, discussed establishing riparian buffers or replacing row crops with energy crops can reduce nutrient runoff in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. He explored methods such as nutrient credit trading for valuing ecosystem services and various payment options.

See the recording of the webinar…

Five Ways Agroforestry Can Grow Forest Products and Benefit Your Land, Your Pockets & Wildlife

Posted October 19, 2016

Non-timber Forest Product Calculator (NTFP) screen shot displayed on a computer monitor.
Riparian forest buffers enhance and protect aquatic resources filtering farm runoff and preventing erosion, support wildlife habitat, produce crops, improve water quality, and reduce flood damage. Photo credit: National Agroforestry Center.

Much of the beauty in American agricultural landscapes is complemented by the trees in those landscapes. Agroforestry practices support agricultural production and help improve water quality and air quality, soil health, and wildlife habitat. These working trees can also grow fiber, food, and energy. Private landowners, including farmers and ranchers, are in a great position to help conserve and protect our trees and forests.

Learn more about agroforestry on the USDA Blog…

Around Agroforestry Archive…

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About Agroforestry

Agroforestry intentionally combines agriculture and forestry to create integrated and sustainable land-use systems. Agroforestry takes advantage of the interactive benefits from combining trees and shrubs with crops and/or livestock. Agroforestry practices include:

About the NAC

The USDA National Agroforestry Center (NAC) had its origins in the 1990 Farm Bill. It began as a Forest Service Research and State & Private Forestry effort in 1992 and expanded into a partnership with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in 1995. It is administered by the Forest Service's, Washington, DC, Office of Research and Development. NAC offices are located in Lincoln, Nebraska and Blacksburg, Virginia.

NAC accelerates the application of agroforestry through a national network of partners. Together, we conduct research, develop technologies and tools, coordinate demonstrations and training, and provide useful information to natural resource professionals.

About Working Trees

The right trees planted in the right places for the right reasons can add value to land-use systems. That's the Working Trees message that helps natural resource professionals, community leaders, and landowners identify with the concept of agroforestry. NAC uses the Working Trees theme to promote the development of sustainable agriculture and communities.

 

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